Ernie Baron

Thomas Ernest BARONAge: 79 years18901969

Name
Thomas Ernest BARON
Given names
Thomas Ernest
Surname
BARON

Ernie BARON

Name
Ernie BARON
Given names
Ernie
Surname
BARON
Birth 24 January 1890 26 30
Residence 5 April 1891 (Age 14 months)
Note: Address at 1891 census
Residence 31 March 1901 (Age 11 years)
Note: Address at 1901 Census
Portrait 1905 (Age 14 years)

Note: Ernie cropped from a family portrait taken in about 1905
Portrait
Ernie About 1911
1911 (Age 20 years)

Portrait
Thomas Ernest, Arthur and James Harold Baron
1914 (Age 23 years)

Note: A portrait of the three Baron brothers taken in about 1914.
Occupation
Commercial Traveller In The Fruit Trade
9 December 1915 (Age 25 years)

Note: Occupation noted on his Attestation.
Residence 9 December 1915 (Age 25 years)
Note: Address noted on his Attestation.
Military
Enlisted
9 December 1915 (Age 25 years)

Note: He enlisted in the Royal Regiment Of Artillery (RH & RFA).
Military
Posted
7 October 1916 (Age 26 years)

Note: Posted with British Expeditionary Force to France.
Military
Posted
15 October 1916 (Age 26 years)

Note: Posted to A/133 Brigade RFA.
Military
Posted
4 December 1916 (Age 26 years)

Note: Posted to B/58 Brigade RFA. This brigade was part of the 11th (Northern) Division. In the months preceding this posting the Division had taken part in the capture of the Wundt- Werk and the battles of Flers-Courcelette and Tiepval on the Somme.
Military
Hospitalised
26 January 1917 (Age 27 years)

Note: Admitted to No 34 Field Ambulance with Rheumatism.
Military
Rejoined Unit
31 January 1917 (Age 27 years)

Note: Released from No 34 Field Ambulance and rejoined B/58 Brigade.
Military
Actions
February 1917 (Age 27 years)

Note: During February and into March 1917 the 11th (Northern) Division, which included Ernie's RFA brigade, took part in a series of actions called Operations On The Ancre. Gains were made and these are illustrated on the map.
Military
Actions
7 June 1917 (Age 27 years)

Note:
The 11th (Northern) Division was moved North to take part in the Battle of Messines. An extract from a despatch of Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig, Commander in Chief of the British Armies in France and Flanders describes the successful assault. "At 3.10 a.m. on the 7th June the nineteen mines were exploded simultaneously beneath the enemy's defences. At the same moment our guns opened and our infantry assault was launched. Covered by a concentrated bombardment, which overwhelmed the enemy's trenches and to a great extent neutralised his batteries, our troops swept over the German foremost defences all along the line. The attack proceeded from the commencement in almost exact accordance with the time-table. The enemy's first trench system offered little resistance to our advance, and the attacking brigades - English, Irish, Australian and Zealand - pressed on up the slopes of the ridge to the assault of the crest line. At 5.30 a.m. Ulster regiments (36th Division) had already reached their second objectives, including l'Enfer Hill and the southern defences of Wytschaete, while on their left a South of Ireland division (16th Division) fought their way through Wytschaete Wood. At 7.0 a.m. New Zealand troops had captured Messines. Men from the western counties of England (19th Division) had cleared the Grand Bois. Other English county regiments (4lst Division) had reached the Dam Strasse, and all along the battle front our second objectives had been gained. Only at a few isolated points did the resistance of the enemy's infantry cause any serious delay. North-east of Messines our infantry (New Zealand Division) were held up for a time by machine gun fire from a strong point known as Fanny's Farm, but the arrival of a tank enabled our progress to be resumed. So rapid was the advance of our infantry, however, that only a few tanks could get forward in time to come into action. Heavy fighting took place in Wytschaete, and further north London troops (47th Division) encountered a serious obstacle in another strong point known as the White Chateau. This redoubt was captured while the morning was yet young, and before midday the two Irish divisions had fought their way side by side through the defences of Wytschaete. Our troops then began to move down the eastern slopes of the ridge, and the divisions in the centre of our attack who had farthest to go, gradually drew level with those on either flank. About 2,000 prisoners had already been brought in, and Australian and English troops had reached the first of the enemy's guns. Our own guns had begun to move forward. Further fighting took place in Ravine Wood, where English county regiments and London troops (4lst and 47th Divisions) killed many Germans, and short-lived resistance was encountered at other points among the many woods and farm houses. Bodies of the enemy continued to hold out in the eastern end of Battle Wood and in strong points constructed in the spoil-banks of the Ypres-Comines Canal. Except at these points, our troops gained their final objectives on both flanks early in the afternoon. In the centre we had reached a position running approximately parallel to the Oosttaverne Line and from 400 to 800 yards to the west of it. The guns required for the attack upon this line had been brought forward, and the troops and tanks detailed to take part were moving up steadily. Meanwhile the bridges and roads leading out of the triangle formed by the River Lys and the canal were kept under the fire of our artillery. The final attack began soon afterwards, and by 3.45 p.m. the village of Oosttaverne had been captured. At 4.0 p.m. troops from the northern and western counties of England (11th and 19th Divisions) entered the Oosttaverne Line east of the village and captured two batteries of German field guns. Half an hour later other English battalions (24th Division) broke through the enemy's position further north. Parties of the enemy were surrendering freely, and his casualties were reported to be very heavy. By the evening the Oosttaverne Line had been taken, and our objectives had been gained. The rapidity with which the attack had been carried through, and the destruction caused by our artillery, made it impossible at first to form more than a rough estimate of our captures. When the final reckoning had been completed, it was found that they included 7,200 prisoners, 67 guns, 94 trench mortars and 294 machine guns."
Military
Action
16 August 1917 (Age 27 years)

Note:
The main British effort of the year was the Third Ypres or Passchendaele. The 11th (Northern) Division took part in the Battle of the Langemarck which is described in an an extract from a despatch of Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig. ".........at 4.45 a.m. on the 16th August our second attack was launched east and north of Ypres on a front extending from the north-west corner of Inverness Copse to our junction with the French south of St. Janshoek. On our left the French undertook the task of clearing up the remainder of the Bixshoote peninsula. On the left of the British attack the English brigades detailed for the assault (29th and 20th Divisions, Major-General W. D. Smith commanding the 20th Division) captured the hamlet of Wijdendrift and reached the southern outskirts of Langemarck. Here some resistance was encountered, but by 8.0 a.m. the village had been taken, after sharp fighting. Our troops then proceeded to attack the portion of the Langemarck-Gheluvelt Line which formed their final objective, and an hour later had gained this also, with the exception of a short length of trench north-east of Langemarck. Two small counter-attacks were repulsed without difficulty. The attack of the First French Army delivered at the same hour was equally successful. On the right a few fortified farms in the neighbourhood of the Steenbeek again gave trouble, and held out for a time. Elsewhere our Allies gained their objectives rapidly, and once more at exceptionally light cost. The bridge-head of Drie Grachten was secured, and the whole of the peninsula cleared of the enemy. In the centre of the British attack the enemy's resistance was more obstinate. The difficulty of making deep mined dug-outs in soil where water lay within a few feet of the surface of the ground had compelled the enemy to construct in the ruins of farms and in other suitable localities a number of strong points or "pill-boxes" built of reinforced concrete often many feet thick. These field forts, distributed in depth all along the front of our advance, offered a serious obstacle to progress. They were heavily armed with machine guns and manned by men determined to hold on at all costs. Many were reduced as our troops advanced, but others held out throughout the day, and delayed the arrival of our supports. In addition, weather conditions made aeroplane observation practically impossible, with the result that no warning was received of the enemy's counter-attacks and our infantry obtained little artillery help against them. When, therefore, later in the morning a heavy counterattack developed in the neighbourhood of the Wieltje-Passchendaele Road, our troops, who had reached their final objectives at many points in this area also, were gradually compelled to fall back. On the left centre West Lancashire Territorials and troops from other English counties (48th and 11th Divisions, Major-General R. Fanshawe commanding the 48th Division) established themselves on a line running north from St. Julien to the old German third line due east of Langemarck. This line they maintained against the enemy's attacks, and thereby secured the flank of our gains further north. On the right of the British attack the enemy again developed the main strength of his resistance. At the end of a day of very heavy fighting, except for small gains of ground on the western edge of Glencorse Wood and north of Westhoek by the 56th Division (Major-General F. A. Dudgeon) and the 8th Division, the situation south of St. Julien remained unchanged. In spite of this partial check on the southern portion of our attack, the day closed as a decided success for the Allies. A wide gap had been made in the old German third line system, and over 2,100 prisoners and some thirty guns had been captured."
Military
Action
4 October 1917 (Age 27 years)

Note: The 11th (Northern) Division took part in the Battles of Broodseinde and Poelcapelle.
Military
Leave
3 November 1917 (Age 27 years)

Note: Granted 14 days leave to UK.
Military
Pay
9 December 1917 (Age 27 years)

Note: Granted Pay Scale Class II at 3d per diem (per day).
Residence 1918 (Age 27 years)
Note: Address on 1918 Voters' List
Military
Conduct
18 January 1918 (Age 27 years)

Note: Accused of making an improper reply to a NCO.
Military
Conduct
21 January 1918 (Age 27 years)

Note:
Awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2 by Captain A L Cameron, Officer Commanding B/58 Brigade RFA, for making an improper reply to a NCO. Field punishments Field Punishment Number 1 consisted of the convicted man being shackled in irons and secured to a fixed object, often a gun wheel or similar. He could only be thus fixed for up to 2 hours in 24, and not for more than 3 days in 4, or for more than 21 days in his sentence. This punishment was often known as 'crucifixion' and due to its humiliating nature was viewed by many Tommies as unfair. Field Punishment Number 2 was similar except the man was shackled but not fixed to anything. Both forms were carried out by the office of the Provost-Marshal, unless his unit was officially on the move when it would be carried out regimentally i.e. by his own unit.
Military
Promotion
4 April 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: Appointed as Paid Lance Bombardier vice 28996 Gunner (Paid/1st Class/Bombardier) Farley reverted. Confirmed in rank.
Military
Promotion
15 April 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: Assumed duties as Lance Bombardier.
Military
Promotion
28 June 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: Appointed Paid/Acting/Bombardier vice 22826 Hawkes appointed Paid/Acting/Corporal.
Military
Promotion
29 June 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: Assumed duties as Paid/Acting/Bombardier.
Military
Promotion
6 July 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: Reverts to Paid/2nd Class/Bombardier due to 22826 Hawkes reverting.
Military
Promotion
7 July 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: Promoted to Bombardier vice Chapman promoted Corporal.
Military
Action
26 August 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: 58 Brigade RFA were at Arras for the 1918 Battle of the Scarpe (26 to 30 August) and the Battle of the Drocourt-Quant Line (2 and 3 September).
Military
Promotion
6 September 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: Assumed duties as Bombardier.
Military
Action
12 September 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: 58 Brigade RFA fought in the Battles of the Hindenburg Line from 12 September to 12 October.
Military
Action
4 November 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note:
58 Brigade RFA fought at the Battle of the Sambre including the passage of the Sambre-Oise canal and the capture of Le Quesnoy and the Passage of the Grande Honelle on 5 to 7 November. This Second Battle of the Sambre, which included the Second Battle of Guise and the Battle of Thiérache was part of the final European Allied offensives of World War I leading up to the Armistice on 11 Nov 1918.
Military
Leave
7 November 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: Granted 7 days leave to UK via Boulogne. This means that Ernie would have probably been at home on Armistice Day.
Military
Conduct
3 December 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: Accused of irregular conduct.
Military
Conduct
4 December 1918 (Age 28 years)

Note: Severely reprimanded by his Commanding Officer Major H R Lodge for irregular conduct in making a complaint contrary to procedure as defined in Section 43 A.A.
Military
Promotion
2 January 1919 (Age 28 years)

Note: Promoted to Paid/Acting Corporal vice Service Number 18008 Paid/Acting Corporal sent to England for demobilization.
Military
Promotion
21 January 1919 (Age 28 years)

Note: Assumed duties as Paid/Acting/Corporal.
Military
Dispersal
22 March 1919 (Age 29 years)

Note: He was sent to Clipstone Camp, Mansfield via Boulogne for the start of the dispersal process from the Royal Field Artillery.
Military
Demobilized
24 May 1919 (Age 29 years)

Note: Dispersal from North Camp, Ripon.
Military
Army Service Record
1920 (Age 29 years)

Military
Medal Card
1920 (Age 29 years)

Occupation
Fruiterer And Greengrocer
1922 (Age 31 years)
Note: Baron Bros. noted in Bridlington Directory 1922/23 This was Arthur and Thomas Ernest
Residence 1936 (Age 45 years)
Note: Waddington's Bridlington Street Directory 1936
Ernest and May Baron
Ernest and May Baron

Note: Outside their greengrocery at 3 Horseforth Ave.

Occupation
Market Gardener Own Account
29 September 1939 (Age 49 years)

Note: Occupation noted at 1939 Register
Residence 29 September 1939 (Age 49 years)
Note: Address noted at 1939 Register.
Death June 1969 (Age 79 years)
Unique identifier
93F1D9429DB84152BC027BB9E7282E954BA9
yes

Last change 3 January 201717:47

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: 22 October 1884The Parish Church, Nafferton, East Yorkshire, England
8 months
elder brother
2 years
elder sister
2 years
himself
2 years
younger sister
3 years
younger brother
3 years
younger sister
2 years
younger sister
Family with May SMITH - View this family
himself
wife
son
13 years
son
daughter
Private
daughter
Private

Residence
Address at 1891 census
Residence
Address at 1901 Census
Portrait
Ernie cropped from a family portrait taken in about 1905
Portrait
A portrait of the three Baron brothers taken in about 1914.
Occupation
Occupation noted on his Attestation.
Residence
Address noted on his Attestation.
Military
He enlisted in the Royal Regiment Of Artillery (RH & RFA).
Military
Posted with British Expeditionary Force to France.
Military
Posted to A/133 Brigade RFA.
Military
Posted to B/58 Brigade RFA. This brigade was part of the 11th (Northern) Division. In the months preceding this posting the Division had taken part in the capture of the Wundt- Werk and the battles of Flers-Courcelette and Tiepval on the Somme.
Military
Admitted to No 34 Field Ambulance with Rheumatism.
Military
Released from No 34 Field Ambulance and rejoined B/58 Brigade.
Military
During February and into March 1917 the 11th (Northern) Division, which included Ernie's RFA brigade, took part in a series of actions called Operations On The Ancre. Gains were made and these are illustrated on the map.
Military
The 11th (Northern) Division was moved North to take part in the Battle of Messines. An extract from a despatch of Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig, Commander in Chief of the British Armies in France and Flanders describes the successful assault. "At 3.10 a.m. on the 7th June the nineteen mines were exploded simultaneously beneath the enemy's defences. At the same moment our guns opened and our infantry assault was launched. Covered by a concentrated bombardment, which overwhelmed the enemy's trenches and to a great extent neutralised his batteries, our troops swept over the German foremost defences all along the line. The attack proceeded from the commencement in almost exact accordance with the time-table. The enemy's first trench system offered little resistance to our advance, and the attacking brigades - English, Irish, Australian and Zealand - pressed on up the slopes of the ridge to the assault of the crest line. At 5.30 a.m. Ulster regiments (36th Division) had already reached their second objectives, including l'Enfer Hill and the southern defences of Wytschaete, while on their left a South of Ireland division (16th Division) fought their way through Wytschaete Wood. At 7.0 a.m. New Zealand troops had captured Messines. Men from the western counties of England (19th Division) had cleared the Grand Bois. Other English county regiments (4lst Division) had reached the Dam Strasse, and all along the battle front our second objectives had been gained. Only at a few isolated points did the resistance of the enemy's infantry cause any serious delay. North-east of Messines our infantry (New Zealand Division) were held up for a time by machine gun fire from a strong point known as Fanny's Farm, but the arrival of a tank enabled our progress to be resumed. So rapid was the advance of our infantry, however, that only a few tanks could get forward in time to come into action. Heavy fighting took place in Wytschaete, and further north London troops (47th Division) encountered a serious obstacle in another strong point known as the White Chateau. This redoubt was captured while the morning was yet young, and before midday the two Irish divisions had fought their way side by side through the defences of Wytschaete. Our troops then began to move down the eastern slopes of the ridge, and the divisions in the centre of our attack who had farthest to go, gradually drew level with those on either flank. About 2,000 prisoners had already been brought in, and Australian and English troops had reached the first of the enemy's guns. Our own guns had begun to move forward. Further fighting took place in Ravine Wood, where English county regiments and London troops (4lst and 47th Divisions) killed many Germans, and short-lived resistance was encountered at other points among the many woods and farm houses. Bodies of the enemy continued to hold out in the eastern end of Battle Wood and in strong points constructed in the spoil-banks of the Ypres-Comines Canal. Except at these points, our troops gained their final objectives on both flanks early in the afternoon. In the centre we had reached a position running approximately parallel to the Oosttaverne Line and from 400 to 800 yards to the west of it. The guns required for the attack upon this line had been brought forward, and the troops and tanks detailed to take part were moving up steadily. Meanwhile the bridges and roads leading out of the triangle formed by the River Lys and the canal were kept under the fire of our artillery. The final attack began soon afterwards, and by 3.45 p.m. the village of Oosttaverne had been captured. At 4.0 p.m. troops from the northern and western counties of England (11th and 19th Divisions) entered the Oosttaverne Line east of the village and captured two batteries of German field guns. Half an hour later other English battalions (24th Division) broke through the enemy's position further north. Parties of the enemy were surrendering freely, and his casualties were reported to be very heavy. By the evening the Oosttaverne Line had been taken, and our objectives had been gained. The rapidity with which the attack had been carried through, and the destruction caused by our artillery, made it impossible at first to form more than a rough estimate of our captures. When the final reckoning had been completed, it was found that they included 7,200 prisoners, 67 guns, 94 trench mortars and 294 machine guns."
Military
The main British effort of the year was the Third Ypres or Passchendaele. The 11th (Northern) Division took part in the Battle of the Langemarck which is described in an an extract from a despatch of Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig. ".........at 4.45 a.m. on the 16th August our second attack was launched east and north of Ypres on a front extending from the north-west corner of Inverness Copse to our junction with the French south of St. Janshoek. On our left the French undertook the task of clearing up the remainder of the Bixshoote peninsula. On the left of the British attack the English brigades detailed for the assault (29th and 20th Divisions, Major-General W. D. Smith commanding the 20th Division) captured the hamlet of Wijdendrift and reached the southern outskirts of Langemarck. Here some resistance was encountered, but by 8.0 a.m. the village had been taken, after sharp fighting. Our troops then proceeded to attack the portion of the Langemarck-Gheluvelt Line which formed their final objective, and an hour later had gained this also, with the exception of a short length of trench north-east of Langemarck. Two small counter-attacks were repulsed without difficulty. The attack of the First French Army delivered at the same hour was equally successful. On the right a few fortified farms in the neighbourhood of the Steenbeek again gave trouble, and held out for a time. Elsewhere our Allies gained their objectives rapidly, and once more at exceptionally light cost. The bridge-head of Drie Grachten was secured, and the whole of the peninsula cleared of the enemy. In the centre of the British attack the enemy's resistance was more obstinate. The difficulty of making deep mined dug-outs in soil where water lay within a few feet of the surface of the ground had compelled the enemy to construct in the ruins of farms and in other suitable localities a number of strong points or "pill-boxes" built of reinforced concrete often many feet thick. These field forts, distributed in depth all along the front of our advance, offered a serious obstacle to progress. They were heavily armed with machine guns and manned by men determined to hold on at all costs. Many were reduced as our troops advanced, but others held out throughout the day, and delayed the arrival of our supports. In addition, weather conditions made aeroplane observation practically impossible, with the result that no warning was received of the enemy's counter-attacks and our infantry obtained little artillery help against them. When, therefore, later in the morning a heavy counterattack developed in the neighbourhood of the Wieltje-Passchendaele Road, our troops, who had reached their final objectives at many points in this area also, were gradually compelled to fall back. On the left centre West Lancashire Territorials and troops from other English counties (48th and 11th Divisions, Major-General R. Fanshawe commanding the 48th Division) established themselves on a line running north from St. Julien to the old German third line due east of Langemarck. This line they maintained against the enemy's attacks, and thereby secured the flank of our gains further north. On the right of the British attack the enemy again developed the main strength of his resistance. At the end of a day of very heavy fighting, except for small gains of ground on the western edge of Glencorse Wood and north of Westhoek by the 56th Division (Major-General F. A. Dudgeon) and the 8th Division, the situation south of St. Julien remained unchanged. In spite of this partial check on the southern portion of our attack, the day closed as a decided success for the Allies. A wide gap had been made in the old German third line system, and over 2,100 prisoners and some thirty guns had been captured."
Military
The 11th (Northern) Division took part in the Battles of Broodseinde and Poelcapelle.
Military
Granted 14 days leave to UK.
Military
Granted Pay Scale Class II at 3d per diem (per day).
Residence
Address on 1918 Voters' List
Military
Accused of making an improper reply to a NCO.
Military
Awarded 7 days Field Punishment No. 2 by Captain A L Cameron, Officer Commanding B/58 Brigade RFA, for making an improper reply to a NCO. Field punishments Field Punishment Number 1 consisted of the convicted man being shackled in irons and secured to a fixed object, often a gun wheel or similar. He could only be thus fixed for up to 2 hours in 24, and not for more than 3 days in 4, or for more than 21 days in his sentence. This punishment was often known as 'crucifixion' and due to its humiliating nature was viewed by many Tommies as unfair. Field Punishment Number 2 was similar except the man was shackled but not fixed to anything. Both forms were carried out by the office of the Provost-Marshal, unless his unit was officially on the move when it would be carried out regimentally i.e. by his own unit.
Military
Appointed as Paid Lance Bombardier vice 28996 Gunner (Paid/1st Class/Bombardier) Farley reverted. Confirmed in rank.
Military
Assumed duties as Lance Bombardier.
Military
Appointed Paid/Acting/Bombardier vice 22826 Hawkes appointed Paid/Acting/Corporal.
Military
Assumed duties as Paid/Acting/Bombardier.
Military
Reverts to Paid/2nd Class/Bombardier due to 22826 Hawkes reverting.
Military
Promoted to Bombardier vice Chapman promoted Corporal.
Military
58 Brigade RFA were at Arras for the 1918 Battle of the Scarpe (26 to 30 August) and the Battle of the Drocourt-Quant Line (2 and 3 September).
Military
Assumed duties as Bombardier.
Military
58 Brigade RFA fought in the Battles of the Hindenburg Line from 12 September to 12 October.
Military
58 Brigade RFA fought at the Battle of the Sambre including the passage of the Sambre-Oise canal and the capture of Le Quesnoy and the Passage of the Grande Honelle on 5 to 7 November. This Second Battle of the Sambre, which included the Second Battle of Guise and the Battle of Thiérache was part of the final European Allied offensives of World War I leading up to the Armistice on 11 Nov 1918.
Military
Granted 7 days leave to UK via Boulogne. This means that Ernie would have probably been at home on Armistice Day.
Military
Accused of irregular conduct.
Military
Severely reprimanded by his Commanding Officer Major H R Lodge for irregular conduct in making a complaint contrary to procedure as defined in Section 43 A.A.
Military
Promoted to Paid/Acting Corporal vice Service Number 18008 Paid/Acting Corporal sent to England for demobilization.
Military
Assumed duties as Paid/Acting/Corporal.
Military
He was sent to Clipstone Camp, Mansfield via Boulogne for the start of the dispersal process from the Royal Field Artillery.
Military
Dispersal from North Camp, Ripon.
Occupation
Baron Bros. noted in Bridlington Directory 1922/23 This was Arthur and Thomas Ernest
Residence
Waddington's Bridlington Street Directory 1936
Occupation
Occupation noted at 1939 Register
Residence
Address noted at 1939 Register.
Shared note
(Research):Birth 24 Jan 1809 (Family Bible entry) Registered Q1 1890 Driffield,9d 323 Death registered Q2 1969 Buckrose,2a 10
PortraitErnie Baron c1905Ernie Baron c1905
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PortraitErnie Baron About 1911Ernie Baron About 1911
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PortraitThomas, Arthur and James BaronThomas, Arthur and James Baron
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MilitaryErnie Baron RFA GunnerErnie Baron RFA Gunner
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MilitaryErnie In A RFA Group PhotoErnie In A RFA Group Photo
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MilitaryOperations On The Ancre 1916-17Operations On The Ancre 1916-17
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MilitaryBattle of Messines 1917Battle of Messines 1917
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MilitaryErnest and Arthur Baron Nov 1917Ernest and Arthur Baron Nov 1917
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MilitaryErnie Baron (R) And A ChumErnie Baron (R) And A Chum
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MilitaryProtection Certificate at DispersalProtection Certificate at Dispersal
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MilitaryErnest Baron Army Service RecordErnest Baron Army Service Record
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MilitaryErnie Baron's Medal CardErnie Baron's Medal Card
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ResidenceErnest and May BaronErnest and May Baron
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Note: Outside their greengrocery at 3 Horseforth Ave.
Media objectErnie BaronErnie Baron
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