Ernest HOURDAge: 30 years18841915

Name
Ernest HOURD
Given names
Ernest
Surname
HOURD
Birth September 1884 24 30
Occupation
Apprentice Brass Finisher
March 31, 1901 (Age 16 years)

Note:
Occupation at 1901 census.
Residence March 31, 1901 (Age 16 years)
Note:
Address at 1901 census.
Military
Enlistment
January 27, 1903 (Age 18 years)
Note: Applied for a Short Service Enlistment (13 years in the colours and 9 years in the reserve) in the Rifle Brigade at Doncaster.
Military
Apointment
March 20, 1903 (Age 18 years)

Note: His Appointment to the Rifle Brigade was Formally authorised.
Military
Posting
June 27, 1903 (Age 18 years)
Note: Posted as a Private to 4th Battalion The Rifle Brigade.
Military
Posting
September 30, 1904 (Age 20 years)
Note: Posted as a Private to 2nd Battalion, The Rifle Brigade.
Military
Award
January 27, 1905 (Age 20 years)

Note: Granted his Good Conduct Badge.
Military
Posting
October 23, 1905 (Age 21 years)
Note: Posted as a Rifleman.
Military
Posting
January 1, 1906 (Age 21 years)

Note: Posted as a Rifleman to 3rd Battalion The Rifle Brigade.
Military
Gratuity And Transfer
January 26, 1906 (Age 21 years)

Note: Paid a gratuity and transferred to the Army Reserve.
Military
Rejoined
July 26, 1906 (Age 21 years)

Note: He rejoined the colours with the 4th Battalion in order to complete 9 years service.
Military
Pay Review
August 1, 1906 (Age 21 years)

Note: Pay Review to Service Pay Class II.
Military
Pay Review
April 17, 1907 (Age 22 years)

Note: Pay Review to Service Pay Class I.
Military
Posted
February 19, 1908 (Age 23 years)
Note:
Embarked on SS Rewa to Malta. HMHS Rewa (His Majesty's Hospital ship) was a steamship originally built for the British-India Steam Navigation Company, but requisitioned for use as a British hospital ship during the First World War. On 4 January 1918, she was hit and sunk by a torpedo from the German U-boat U-55.
Military
Good Conduct
July 26, 1908 (Age 23 years)

Note: Granted 2 Good Conduct Badges.
Military
Posted
January 19, 1909 (Age 24 years)
Note:
Embarked on the SS Braemar Castle to Cairo, Egypt. The Troopship Braemar Castle was one of the last ships built for the Castle Line before its merger with the Union Line, Braemar Castle was a product of Barclay, Curle & Co., of Glasgow. Destined to spend most of her career in Government service, she was delivered in the summer of 1899 and placed on the line's intermediate service from Southampton to South Africa. When Union-Castle was created in March 1900, Braemar Castle remained on the merged line's intermediate service, although her British base was moved to London. From 1909 on, when she became a peacetime troop transport, Braemar Castle was used almost exclusively for military purposes, except for one commercial voyage for Union-Castle in 1920. During World War I she served in a variety of roles: cross-channel troop transport for the British Expeditionary Force (1914); troop transport for the Gallipoli campaign (1915); and hospital ship (from 1915). On November 23, 1916, while serving as a hospital ship, she struck a mine in the Mykoni Channel, Aegean Sea and was badly damaged. The mines had been laid by the German minelaying submarine U73. She was repaired at La Spezia (after being towed to Malta, where she waited unrepaired for three months). In March 1918, Braemar Castle was sent to Murmansk, Russia, and spent nearly a year there as a base hospital for British and French troops engaged in the Allied Northern Campaign. She returned to Russia in 1921 and, carrying patients and non-Russian medical personnel, was the last non-Russian ship to leave Archangel. She was later used to transport troops to Turkey and Cyprus during and after the 1922 fighting between Turkey and Greece. Braemar Castle made her final trooping voyage in September 1924 and was then sold for scrapping in Italy. Sources: Haws' Merchant Fleets; Mallett's The Union-Castle Line; Dunn's Ships of the Union-Castle Line.

Military
Promotion
December 2, 1909 (Age 25 years)

Note: Appointed as Acting Corporal, unpaid.
Military
Promotion
September 9, 1910 (Age 26 years)

Note: Appointed as Acting Corporal, paid.
Military
Conduct
September 9, 1910 (Age 26 years)

Note: Absent from duty. Reprimanded.
Military
Reversion
January 12, 1911 (Age 26 years)

Note: Reverted to Rifleman at his own request.
Occupation
Rifleman with 1st Battalion The Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own)
April 2, 1911 (Age 26 years)

Note: Occupation at 1911 census.
Military
Posted
October 10, 1911 (Age 27 years)

Note: Repatriated from Cairo, Egypt.
Military
Transfer
December 8, 1911 (Age 27 years)

Note: Transferred to the Reserve with his consent.
Military
Drafted
August 24, 1914 (Age 29 years)

Note: Enlisted in Bridlington. He requested and was appointed to the Rifle Brigade.
Military
Promotion
November 5, 1914 (Age 30 years)

Note: Promotion to Lance Corporal.
Military
2nd Battle of Ypres
April 22, 1915 (Age 30 years)

Note:
The Order of Battle for the 2nd Battle of Ypres between 22 April 1915 and 25 May 1915 shows the 1st Battalion of the Rifle Brigade in the 11th Brigade as part of the 4th Division under the command of Major General H.F.M. Wilson. When the German gas attack initiated the 2nd Battle of Ypres on 22 April 1915, 4th Division was in GHQ (General Head Quarters) Reserve, and over the following days parts of it were sent up piecemeal to reinforce the Canadian Division, plug gaps in the line, and take part in the counter-attacks around Kitchener's Wood. It was not until 4 May that Wilson was able to reassemble his division to relieve the Canadians \endash parts of it had been assigned to six different divisions.
Death May 3, 1915 (Age 30 years)
Shared note: Lance Corporal Ernest Hourd No 9661 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consorts Own) Killed in action Ypres, Belgium on 3 May 1915

Military
Service Record
1919 (3 years after death)

Burialyes

Unique identifier
6528E6765E894F76AEDEF24A3BB3958A6A1A
yes

Last change September 18, 201301:13

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: September 1879Doncaster, West Yorkshire, England
2 years
elder sister
3 years
himself
2 years
younger brother
3 years
younger sister
3 years
younger brother
2 years
younger brother

Occupation
Occupation at 1901 census.
Residence
Address at 1901 census.
Military
Applied for a Short Service Enlistment (13 years in the colours and 9 years in the reserve) in the Rifle Brigade at Doncaster.
Military
His Appointment to the Rifle Brigade was Formally authorised.
Military
Posted as a Private to 4th Battalion The Rifle Brigade.
Military
Posted as a Private to 2nd Battalion, The Rifle Brigade.
Military
Granted his Good Conduct Badge.
Military
Posted as a Rifleman.
Military
Posted as a Rifleman to 3rd Battalion The Rifle Brigade.
Military
Paid a gratuity and transferred to the Army Reserve.
Military
He rejoined the colours with the 4th Battalion in order to complete 9 years service.
Military
Pay Review to Service Pay Class II.
Military
Pay Review to Service Pay Class I.
Military
Embarked on SS Rewa to Malta. HMHS Rewa (His Majesty's Hospital ship) was a steamship originally built for the British-India Steam Navigation Company, but requisitioned for use as a British hospital ship during the First World War. On 4 January 1918, she was hit and sunk by a torpedo from the German U-boat U-55.
Military
Granted 2 Good Conduct Badges.
Military
Embarked on the SS Braemar Castle to Cairo, Egypt. The Troopship Braemar Castle was one of the last ships built for the Castle Line before its merger with the Union Line, Braemar Castle was a product of Barclay, Curle & Co., of Glasgow. Destined to spend most of her career in Government service, she was delivered in the summer of 1899 and placed on the line's intermediate service from Southampton to South Africa. When Union-Castle was created in March 1900, Braemar Castle remained on the merged line's intermediate service, although her British base was moved to London. From 1909 on, when she became a peacetime troop transport, Braemar Castle was used almost exclusively for military purposes, except for one commercial voyage for Union-Castle in 1920. During World War I she served in a variety of roles: cross-channel troop transport for the British Expeditionary Force (1914); troop transport for the Gallipoli campaign (1915); and hospital ship (from 1915). On November 23, 1916, while serving as a hospital ship, she struck a mine in the Mykoni Channel, Aegean Sea and was badly damaged. The mines had been laid by the German minelaying submarine U73. She was repaired at La Spezia (after being towed to Malta, where she waited unrepaired for three months). In March 1918, Braemar Castle was sent to Murmansk, Russia, and spent nearly a year there as a base hospital for British and French troops engaged in the Allied Northern Campaign. She returned to Russia in 1921 and, carrying patients and non-Russian medical personnel, was the last non-Russian ship to leave Archangel. She was later used to transport troops to Turkey and Cyprus during and after the 1922 fighting between Turkey and Greece. Braemar Castle made her final trooping voyage in September 1924 and was then sold for scrapping in Italy. Sources: Haws' Merchant Fleets; Mallett's The Union-Castle Line; Dunn's Ships of the Union-Castle Line.
Military
Appointed as Acting Corporal, unpaid.
Military
Appointed as Acting Corporal, paid.
Military
Absent from duty. Reprimanded.
Military
Reverted to Rifleman at his own request.
Occupation
Occupation at 1911 census.
Military
Repatriated from Cairo, Egypt.
Military
Transferred to the Reserve with his consent.
Military
Enlisted in Bridlington. He requested and was appointed to the Rifle Brigade.
Military
Promotion to Lance Corporal.
Military
The Order of Battle for the 2nd Battle of Ypres between 22 April 1915 and 25 May 1915 shows the 1st Battalion of the Rifle Brigade in the 11th Brigade as part of the 4th Division under the command of Major General H.F.M. Wilson. When the German gas attack initiated the 2nd Battle of Ypres on 22 April 1915, 4th Division was in GHQ (General Head Quarters) Reserve, and over the following days parts of it were sent up piecemeal to reinforce the Canadian Division, plug gaps in the line, and take part in the counter-attacks around Kitchener's Wood. It was not until 4 May that Wilson was able to reassemble his division to relieve the Canadians \endash parts of it had been assigned to six different divisions.
Death
Lance Corporal Ernest Hourd No 9661 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consorts Own) Killed in action Ypres, Belgium on 3 May 1915
Shared note
(Research):Birth Q3 1884 Doncaster,9c 693 Killed in Action in Belgium on 3 May 1915
MilitaryRifle Brigade Cap BadgeRifle Brigade Cap Badge
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MilitarySS RewaSS Rewa
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MilitarySS Braemar CastleSS Braemar Castle
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MilitarySS Braemar CastleSS Braemar Castle
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OccupationRifle Brigade Cap BadgeRifle Brigade Cap Badge
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Military2nd Battle Of Ypres2nd Battle Of Ypres
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DeathErnest Hourd, Bridlington CenotaphErnest Hourd, Bridlington Cenotaph
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DeathErnest Hourd, Memorial PlaqueErnest Hourd, Memorial Plaque
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MilitaryErnest Hourd's Service RecordErnest Hourd's Service Record
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BurialWar Grave CertificateWar Grave Certificate
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